Bratislava, Slovak Republic, June 1-3, 2016

Plenary Speakers

Magnus Egerstedt

Magnus Egerstedt

Schlumberger Professor
Associate Chair for Research
Electrical and Computer Engineering
Georgia Institute of Technology
www.ece.gatech.edu/~magnus

Title
Controls Classes on a Massive Scale: The Good, the Bad, the Ugly
Abstract
Bridging the theory-practice gap in engineering education is a well-known, hard nut to crack. This is particularly true in the controls curriculum, where deep mathematical theory must coexist alongside practical experiments and considerations. In this talk, we will discuss how this bridge-building can be approached both in a MOOC (Massive Open Online Course) setting, in flipped classrooms, and through the use of remote-access robotics testbeds. In particular, the recent MOOC, Control of Mobile Robots, has been used to flip classrooms in robotics and controls classes at the Georgia Institute of Technology and at other institutions. The students take the MOOC and come to class prepared to program robots. In this talk, we will discuss the outcomes of these educational experiments, show that control classes are potentially ideal candidates for flipped classes, yet present real challenges for meaningful learning experiences. 
Biography
Magnus Egerstedt is the Schlumberger Professor in the School of Electrical and Computer Engineering at the Georgia Institute of Technology, where he serves as Associate Chair for Research. He received the M.S. degree in Engineering Physics and the Ph.D. degree in Applied Mathematics from the Royal Institute of Technology, Stockholm, Sweden, the B.A. degree in Philosophy from Stockholm University, and was a Postdoctoral Scholar at Harvard University. Dr. Egerstedt is the director of the Georgia Robotics and Intelligent Systems Laboratory (GRITS Lab), a Fellow of the IEEE, and a recipient of a number of research and teaching awards, including the Ragazzini Award from AACC.
 

 

Laura Menini

Laura Menini

Associate Professor
Department of Civil Engineering and Computer Science
University of Rome Tor Vergata

Title
Design of control engineering curricula for traditional and new applications
Abstract
Control engineering is today essential in many applications, and new areas are emerging, in which the systems and control approach should become vital. Despite its success and maturity, control has been called "the hidden technology" in a famous lecture by K.J. Astrom, because of the difficulty in rendering evident the role of control to a wider audience. Therefore, when planning a control engineering curriculum, several trade-offs are to be considered: topics from almost all the areas of engineering can be included, to increase the ability to communicate with other engineers, but a high level of mathematics is also desirable, application perspectives need to be included to attract students, but without risking to loose the specificity of the program, otherwise good students could think that studying control means "to know nothing about everything". The specific choices made in different case studies will be compared taking also into account the different situations deriving from local issues (e.g., industries or research institutions focused in specific application domains).
Biography
Laura Menini was born in Rome (Italy), in 1970. She graduated (summa cum laude) in ``Mechanical Engineering'' (July 15, 1993),and she obtained the PhD in ``Computer Science and Control'' (July 8, 1997), at the University of Roma Tor Vergata, where she has been Researcher (1997-2001) and she is now Associate Professor (since 2001). She has been visiting scholar at the University of New Mexico (Albuquerque, NM, US), in 1995, and at the Imperial College (London, UK) in 2000. She is Associate Editor of the journals: IEEE Transactions on Automatic Control, Systems and Control Letters, Control Engineering Practice and European Journal of Control. She is Chair of the IFAC Technical Committee 2.1 Control Design and Associate Editor of the Conference Editorial Board of the IEEE Control System Society. Her research interest include: nonlinear control, geometric control, hybrid systems, mechanical systems and linear periodic control systems.
 

 

Kouhei Ohnishi

Kouhei Ohnishi

Professor Kouhei Ohnishi,  Ph.D  FIEEE
Keio University
Department of System Design Engineering
3-14-1 Hiyoshi, Kohoku, Yokohama
223-8522  Japan

Title
Soft Robotics
Abstract
Humans can identify the physical characteristic of the object in an instant just by touching it. They can easily distinguish if the object is soft like a sponge, is rigid like an iron, has elasticity like a balloon, or is moving by itself. That sensation is an ability of the human being called “haptic sense”. “Real-haptics” is a technology to reconstruct haptic sense by acquiring dynamic physical information that is transferred bi-directionally between the surrounding environment and the human. An abandonment of haptics causes difficulty in further advance in automated machine, or may even result in threatening the safety and security of the process.
Maybe large gap between real human and robot comes from the excessive expectation induced at first from the sf movie entitled "Metropolis" released in 1926.  In fact, the artificial machine has been developed from the machine tool.  The performance has been measured by its stiffness almost proportional to the forward gain in the servo control. High stiffness seems to give high performance, however lose compliant motion.  The robot motion based on the existing servo system is quite stiff and generates the motion far from the human action. Soft robotics is a new concept coming from real haptics.  This gives not only compliant motion but also skillful motion to the robot and/or mechatronics.  The talk will show the structure of motion control together with its implementation.
Biography
Dr. Kouhei Ohnishi received B.E.(1975), M.E.(1977) and Ph.D.(1980) all in electrical engineering from the University of Tokyo.  Since 1980, he has been with Keio University, and is Professor at Dept. of System Design Engineering. He has been active in the IEEE IES for long time.  He served as a Vice President (2002-2005), President–elect (2006-2007), President (2008- 2009) for IES.  He is now serving as a President at the Institute of Electrical Engineers of Japan (IEEJ) as well as a Member of Science Council of Japan.